Worship

"Ascribe to the Lord the glory due his name; worship the Lord in the splendor of holiness." Psalm 29:2

 

We enter worship together to celebrate the love and grace of our Lord Jesus Christ. Below, explore how to grow in reverence and joy.

Matins and Vespers: New Collection by Liturgical Folk

Music makes the prayers more accessible to us, and much of the Daily Office is actually meant to be sung. So, since there is none in the prayer book, we made up our own music.

Transformed and Renewed by the Eucharist

As we receive the wine and bread, we don't simply receive a reminder of Jesus' sacrifice, but a measure of the grace and new life that this sacrifice purchased for us. By the power of the Holy Spirit, we are transformed and renewed each week to more fully reflect the hope and life of Christ to a hurting world.

The Role of Music in Liturgical Worship: An Interview with Ryan Flanigan

Music serves the liturgy; it does not stand as a liturgy in itself. Music aids the people in singing the praises of God. Music opens the hearts, minds and emotions of worshipers to experience the beauty of the Lord. Music is NOT a neutral vehicle for words; it is not just a cognitive exercise.

(Re)formed In Worship

Caleb+ Miller, Winter Conference 2017

The Real Reason We Pass the Peace

The peace that Christ gives is richer, deeper and eternal. Ultimately, it is a peace that comes alongside the gift of the Holy Spirit, which means it is a peace that comes from being united into the immutable peace of God Himself. So even while we wait for the fullness that will come with His return, we have the deposit that guarantees it.

What’s So Special About the Creeds, Anyway?

In The Anglican Mission, we see the historic creeds as our sure guide, both to modern faith and practice, but also to the historic faith of the catholic, apostolic church.

Worship and Truth: How Worshipful Prayers Give Fire to Anglican Theology

What is more fundamental to the heart of Anglican theology: the 39 Articles or the Book of Common Prayer? Gavin+ Pate explores why both are essential for an enlarged faith and enlivened liturgy.